Monday's Kick - September 11, 2017

As many of you know, I've started doing more journaling and content work with my consulting page. In terms of what I feature and how I approach it, it's been a bit random - really whatever strikes my fancy. Moving forward I'd like to feature a lot more professional writing and do better at featuring some of my client work. For example, the picture above was taken by photojournalist on my campaign team. We worked in tandem to document the annual meeting of liver research professionals. This was not just any ordinary meeting. These were the top liver research professionals in the world and the field just experienced a major milestone - the cure for Hepatitis C.  This meeting was held in Boston and this picture was taken at the Boston Public Library. We essentially embarked on a visual ethnography - immersing ourselves in the culture of this professional field. We photographed/interviewed liver research professionals (clinicians, academics, researchers), the association (my client), and the pharmaceuticals. Our experience showed the complexity of the medical field and the inner-workings of stakeholders involved. This article gets at some it.  Expect more examples of my work moving forward. I look forward to sharing with you some great projects I've been fortunate to be involved in. + THIS WEEK My head is down preparing for a meeting later this week, and of course final round(s) of promotion for the September 18th STORY event. And we have *sun* - so I will be on my bike. + WHAT WE'RE PAYING ATTENTION TO I love Brain Pickings. Here is a classic from their archive. Another winner from Farnam Street blog - The Narrative Fallacy. Recently I had a conversation about company museums, which have proven to offer some innovative work around brands. Here is an article from The Economist called "Museums of Mammon". From Communication Arts - "Why Story-Based Branding Is Your Secret Weapon" An ongoing conversation in the agency consulting world, now at a crossroads. This article brings up important points.  

As many of you know, I've started doing more journaling and content work with my consulting page. In terms of what I feature and how I approach it, it's been a bit random - really whatever strikes my fancy. Moving forward I'd like to feature a lot more professional writing and do better at featuring some of my client work.

For example, the picture above was taken by photojournalist on my campaign team. We worked in tandem to document the annual meeting of liver research professionals. This was not just any ordinary meeting. These were the top liver research professionals in the world and the field just experienced a major milestone - the cure for Hepatitis C

This meeting was held in Boston and this picture was taken at the Boston Public Library. We essentially embarked on a visual ethnography - immersing ourselves in the culture of this professional field. We photographed/interviewed liver research professionals (clinicians, academics, researchers), the association (my client), and the pharmaceuticals. Our experience showed the complexity of the medical field and the inner-workings of stakeholders involved. This article gets at some it. 

Expect more examples of my work moving forward. I look forward to sharing with you some great projects I've been fortunate to be involved in.

+ THIS WEEK

My head is down preparing for a meeting later this week, and of course final round(s) of promotion for the September 18th STORY event. And we have *sun* - so I will be on my bike.

+ WHAT WE'RE PAYING ATTENTION TO

I love Brain Pickings. Here is a classic from their archive.

Another winner from Farnam Street blog - The Narrative Fallacy.

Recently I had a conversation about company museums, which have proven to offer some innovative work around brands. Here is an article from The Economist called "Museums of Mammon".

From Communication Arts - "Why Story-Based Branding Is Your Secret Weapon"

An ongoing conversation in the agency consulting world, now at a crossroads. This article brings up important points.

 

 

 

 

 

Ann Yoders